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  • Differentiating the different type of paints used in artwork Differentiating the different type of paints used in artwork

    Posted on by Kai Wei Teng

    Artpicktexture Oil Painting Macro Shot

    Types of Paint to look out for in an Artwork.

    Knowing the different type of paints that are available for us to utilize and create is an important step in understanding how each artwork can be crafted. We examine five different types of paints: namely; Watercolor, Acrylics, OilsGouache and Encaustics. As each paint requires a different type of technique and skill set to master, an individual might find themselves of being able to express better by using the right paint.

    Oil Paints

    Oil Paints At Artpicktexture

    Oils are the thickest paints and easiest to control. They take days to dry so you can work with the paint for hours to get the images you want. Once applied to a canvas, you can work in other colors, changing the form and textures are easy, all over long periods of time. If you make a mistake, you can scrape of an entire layer of paint without damaging the layers underneath. The disadvantage of oils is that they are more expensive and more materials are needed to work with them. They are also messy and you cannot use water to clean them up where you need some assistance from turpentine.

    Acrylics Paints

    Acrylics Paints by Artpicktexture

    Acrylics are good for beginners. They are easy to work with because they're thicker than watercolor paints. Because they are thick, they are easy to blend with other colors and easy to control when painting them on a canvas. Acrylics dry quickly and turn into plastic, so if you make a mistake it is easy to wait a few minutes for it to dry and then paint right overtop of the mistake. But be careful, and keep the paint wet or it could be tough to use and clean up.

    Watercolor Paints

    Watercolor Artwork by Artpicktexture

    Watercolor paints are arguably one of the oldest forms of art making in the world. They are created when pigments are mixed with gum, such as gum arabic, and diluted with water to create a thin, transparent medium. Neolithic cave paintings were decorated with primitive watercolor images, and Ancient Egyptians used water based paints on the walls of tombs. However, it was the Chinese and Japanese artists of the early 17th century that truly brought watercolor to a distinctive art form. This medium is famous for its translucent washes, and it’s ability to be built up in thin layers. Watercolor also differs greatly from other mediums in the technique in which it is laid down. While paintings in oil and acrylic achieve areas of white by applying opaque pigment, watercolorists builds up the darks and leave the bare white of the painting surface as highlights. This characteristic and the unpredictable nature of watercolor makes it a uniquely challenging art form. Watercolors can be cleaned using soap and water and do not permanently dry, unless coated or mixed with another medium.

    Gouache Paints

    Gouache Art by Artpicktexture

    Gouache paints are just as historically venerable as watercolors, and are made in a similar way. Indeed, gouache is simply watercolor mixed with an opaque white in order to add opacity. The pigment particles in watercolors become trapped and held by the fibers of the surface it’s used on. Gouache particles on the other hand, lie on top of the painting surface, making a smooth, coated layer. This difference makes the medium thicker, but capable of capturing brilliance in the same way as oil paints. The way this medium reflects light made it very popular with Rococo artists in the 1700’s, however like watercolors, it is highly effected by moisture, and can be susceptible to warping or discoloration if left in a damp environment.

    Encaustics Paints

    Encaustics Paints by Artpicktexture

    Encaustics are a type of paint created when pigments are mixed with hot, liquid wax. The use of encaustics date back as far as 5th century Rome. Wax was originally used to protect material from damage, such as ships. Encaustics were born from the colored wax used to decorate and protect Greek and Roman naval fleets. This medium is very similar to oil as it is visually rich, with a wide range of textures that can be accomplished. One reason artists preferred using encaustics was due to its longevity. It had far greater durability than both watercolor and oil paints, as it was not affected by moisture. However, there were enormous practical difficulties in using a medium that had to be kept warm. Once an artist finished applying the color pigments to the painting surface, a heat source was then passed over them until each individual wax application fused into a uniform layer. After this process was completed, the painting would be left to cur for a few months. The “burning in” of the pigments was the trademark of the encaustic technique, and it’s this characteristic that made portraits in encaustic so strikingly lifelike. However, during the burning it was easy for the heat to become to intense, causing colors to blur together. Encaustics can be cleaned by dipping brushes in soy wax, following with soap and water.

     

    Artpicktexture Oil Painting Macro Shot

    Types of Paint to look out for in an Artwork.

    Knowing the different type of paints that are available for us to utilize and create is an important step in understanding how each artwork can be crafted. We examine five different types of paints: namely; Watercolor, Acrylics, OilsGouache and Encaustics. As each paint requires a different type of technique and skill set to master, an individual might find themselves of being able to express better by using the right paint.

    Oil Paints

    Oil Paints At Artpicktexture

    Oils are the thickest paints and easiest to control. They take days to dry so you can work with the paint for hours to get the images you want. Once applied to a canvas, you can work in other colors, changing the form and textures are easy, all over long periods of time. If you make a mistake, you can scrape of an entire layer of paint without damaging the layers underneath. The disadvantage of oils is that they are more expensive and more materials are needed to work with them. They are also messy and you cannot use water to clean them up where you need some assistance from turpentine.

    Acrylics Paints

    Acrylics Paints by Artpicktexture

    Acrylics are good for beginners. They are easy to work with because they're thicker than watercolor paints. Because they are thick, they are easy to blend with other colors and easy to control when painting them on a canvas. Acrylics dry quickly and turn into plastic, so if you make a mistake it is easy to wait a few minutes for it to dry and then paint right overtop of the mistake. But be careful, and keep the paint wet or it could be tough to use and clean up.

    Watercolor Paints

    Watercolor Artwork by Artpicktexture

    Watercolor paints are arguably one of the oldest forms of art making in the world. They are created when pigments are mixed with gum, such as gum arabic, and diluted with water to create a thin, transparent medium. Neolithic cave paintings were decorated with primitive watercolor images, and Ancient Egyptians used water based paints on the walls of tombs. However, it was the Chinese and Japanese artists of the early 17th century that truly brought watercolor to a distinctive art form. This medium is famous for its translucent washes, and it’s ability to be built up in thin layers. Watercolor also differs greatly from other mediums in the technique in which it is laid down. While paintings in oil and acrylic achieve areas of white by applying opaque pigment, watercolorists builds up the darks and leave the bare white of the painting surface as highlights. This characteristic and the unpredictable nature of watercolor makes it a uniquely challenging art form. Watercolors can be cleaned using soap and water and do not permanently dry, unless coated or mixed with another medium.

    Gouache Paints

    Gouache Art by Artpicktexture

    Gouache paints are just as historically venerable as watercolors, and are made in a similar way. Indeed, gouache is simply watercolor mixed with an opaque white in order to add opacity. The pigment particles in watercolors become trapped and held by the fibers of the surface it’s used on. Gouache particles on the other hand, lie on top of the painting surface, making a smooth, coated layer. This difference makes the medium thicker, but capable of capturing brilliance in the same way as oil paints. The way this medium reflects light made it very popular with Rococo artists in the 1700’s, however like watercolors, it is highly effected by moisture, and can be susceptible to warping or discoloration if left in a damp environment.

    Encaustics Paints

    Encaustics Paints by Artpicktexture

    Encaustics are a type of paint created when pigments are mixed with hot, liquid wax. The use of encaustics date back as far as 5th century Rome. Wax was originally used to protect material from damage, such as ships. Encaustics were born from the colored wax used to decorate and protect Greek and Roman naval fleets. This medium is very similar to oil as it is visually rich, with a wide range of textures that can be accomplished. One reason artists preferred using encaustics was due to its longevity. It had far greater durability than both watercolor and oil paints, as it was not affected by moisture. However, there were enormous practical difficulties in using a medium that had to be kept warm. Once an artist finished applying the color pigments to the painting surface, a heat source was then passed over them until each individual wax application fused into a uniform layer. After this process was completed, the painting would be left to cur for a few months. The “burning in” of the pigments was the trademark of the encaustic technique, and it’s this characteristic that made portraits in encaustic so strikingly lifelike. However, during the burning it was easy for the heat to become to intense, causing colors to blur together. Encaustics can be cleaned by dipping brushes in soy wax, following with soap and water.

     

    Read more

  • Choosing The Right Art For Your Home or Office Space Choosing The Right Art For Your Home or Office Space

    Posted on by Kai Wei Teng

    Artpicktexture Oil Painting

    Finding the right art work for your home or office space has never been easy. Here is our Top 10 Ideas for helping you to choose that perfect piece.

    Artpicktexture Mix Media Paintings

    1. Select the most important and visible walls in your home. The art that you decide to bring into your house is important to you so give it room to shine by leaving some walls blank. It is not necessary to hang something on every wall. The mantle is a great place for a piece that you love as your eye is drawn to it and it is often one of the first areas noticed in a living room.

    Artpicktexture Oil Painting

    2. Mirror the size of the wall: If you have a long horizontal wall hang a long horizontal piece (or collection of pieces) on that wall. If you have a narrow vertical spot, place a piece that is narrow and vertical and that fills the space. By accentuating the height or length of the wall, you make the room feel larger.

    Artpicktexture Mix Media Artwork

    3. Fill the wall! Don’t be afraid to use the entire wall—many people think they can’t handle a big piece of art when they can.

    Artpicktexture Artwork

    4. Color is important: Think about the feel of a color before placing it in your room. Light blues and greens are cool, serene colors that are well suited for a room meant for rest and relaxation such as a bedroom. It is nice to greet people in an entry space with warmer tones, welcoming them into the home.

    Artpicktexture Oil Painting Artwork

    5. Color is important, this is worth repeating! Think about the feel of a color before placing it in your room. Deep bold colors are stronger and have a way of drawing a visitor in. These pieces are great in a living room, dining room or kitchen where we invite conversation and entertainment. 

    Artpicktexture Artisan Series

    6. Don’t let the architectural style of your home dictate the art that you have on your walls. Contemporary art can be wonderful in a traditional setting and often has an impact on a room that a more traditional landscape wouldn't have.

    Artpicktexture Mix Media Artwork

    7. Vary the texture of the pieces in your room. If you have a photograph behind glass above your favorite chair, you may want to choose a piece of art on canvas for above your sofa. Variety is good when you hang art in a room!

    Artpicktexture Oil Painting Frame

    8. A frame can serve as a bridge between the artwork and the room.
    When selecting a frame, it is important that it complement the furniture and architectural features of a room.. Choose a frame to match the wood floors or if you have gold lamps in your living room, select a golf frame for the art. A frame can be particularly helpful when bringing modern art into a traditional home.

    Artpicktexture Oil Painting Artisan

    9. Play with the lighting in the room: After placing the artwork, move your existing lighting around or think about adding new spots to illuminate the piece. A well-lit piece of art will draw visitors into your space.

    Artpicktexture Art Painting

    10. Watch out for glare: When hanging art behind glass, stay away from walls directly across from windows as the light will create glare and the piece will be lost on the wall. Non-reflective museum glass is available at a higher price but worth it if glare is an issue.

    Artpicktexture Oil Painting

    Finding the right art work for your home or office space has never been easy. Here is our Top 10 Ideas for helping you to choose that perfect piece.

    Artpicktexture Mix Media Paintings

    1. Select the most important and visible walls in your home. The art that you decide to bring into your house is important to you so give it room to shine by leaving some walls blank. It is not necessary to hang something on every wall. The mantle is a great place for a piece that you love as your eye is drawn to it and it is often one of the first areas noticed in a living room.

    Artpicktexture Oil Painting

    2. Mirror the size of the wall: If you have a long horizontal wall hang a long horizontal piece (or collection of pieces) on that wall. If you have a narrow vertical spot, place a piece that is narrow and vertical and that fills the space. By accentuating the height or length of the wall, you make the room feel larger.

    Artpicktexture Mix Media Artwork

    3. Fill the wall! Don’t be afraid to use the entire wall—many people think they can’t handle a big piece of art when they can.

    Artpicktexture Artwork

    4. Color is important: Think about the feel of a color before placing it in your room. Light blues and greens are cool, serene colors that are well suited for a room meant for rest and relaxation such as a bedroom. It is nice to greet people in an entry space with warmer tones, welcoming them into the home.

    Artpicktexture Oil Painting Artwork

    5. Color is important, this is worth repeating! Think about the feel of a color before placing it in your room. Deep bold colors are stronger and have a way of drawing a visitor in. These pieces are great in a living room, dining room or kitchen where we invite conversation and entertainment. 

    Artpicktexture Artisan Series

    6. Don’t let the architectural style of your home dictate the art that you have on your walls. Contemporary art can be wonderful in a traditional setting and often has an impact on a room that a more traditional landscape wouldn't have.

    Artpicktexture Mix Media Artwork

    7. Vary the texture of the pieces in your room. If you have a photograph behind glass above your favorite chair, you may want to choose a piece of art on canvas for above your sofa. Variety is good when you hang art in a room!

    Artpicktexture Oil Painting Frame

    8. A frame can serve as a bridge between the artwork and the room.
    When selecting a frame, it is important that it complement the furniture and architectural features of a room.. Choose a frame to match the wood floors or if you have gold lamps in your living room, select a golf frame for the art. A frame can be particularly helpful when bringing modern art into a traditional home.

    Artpicktexture Oil Painting Artisan

    9. Play with the lighting in the room: After placing the artwork, move your existing lighting around or think about adding new spots to illuminate the piece. A well-lit piece of art will draw visitors into your space.

    Artpicktexture Art Painting

    10. Watch out for glare: When hanging art behind glass, stay away from walls directly across from windows as the light will create glare and the piece will be lost on the wall. Non-reflective museum glass is available at a higher price but worth it if glare is an issue.

    Read more

  • The Great Benefits of Painting (All 11 of Them!) The Great Benefits of Painting (All 11 of Them!)

    Posted on by Kai Wei Teng

    Mix Media Artwork with Artpicktexture

    A few days ago I was asked about why painting is good for you and the reasons why an elderly person should take painting lessons into consideration as a positive activity for them. I thought this was an interesting question and an excellent topic for my blog.

    One would think that the first reason is because it gives pleasure, at least that is why I paint! Being able to do what one wants provides great satisfaction.

    After a little more meditation and research from a psychological, social and medical point of view, I have found many more benefits for the physical, mental and spiritual body not only of children but adults as well. Since I mostly teach adolescents and adults, let me summarize the information in this way:

    1. Communication
    Art makes us more human; it helps us to communicate in a different, personal language. This is a great benefit for all people and mainly for those who have conditions with a lack of communication or problems expressing themselves such as: shyness, autism and other disabilities.

    Mix Media Artwork by Artpicktexture

    2. Therapy
    Painting is an individual activity even in the workshop or classroom; the student enters his/her own world, a world full of possibilities. Stimulus of the creative mind allow the student to positively isolate from reality, which provides a mental rest that lowers stress and generates relaxation and happiness feelings. This is especially significant for people with aggression or nervousness conditions.

    3. Self-esteem
    Working in a non-competitive, relaxed environment (the teacher plays a major role here) will enable the student come closer to greater personal achievements; this will strengthen his/her individuality and self-esteem. This is especially significant for people with codependency, traumatic conditions and elderly people who need activities that can strengthen their autonomy.

    Mix Media Artwork by Artpicktexture

    4. Mobility
    Learning to hold and handle a brush and/or pencil will help regulate the hand movements and stimulate brain connections at the same time the skill is being developed. In elderly people, painting helps them strengthen their fine motor skill.

    5. Concentration and Healing
    People who immerse themselves several hours painting or creating something enter a purer area, in a very strong state of concentration; they abstract themselves from their surroundings and time passes by without noticing it. Physical pains fade away; it is almost like entering another dimension without leaving our body. This concentration state is called Alpha; one part of the brain is conscious and the other pulls the unconscious out. There is more creation because a pure energy is transmitted to what´s being created, and we can spend hours without feeling tiredness, pain or other conditions (unlike other activities.) This is a state similar to that achieved through praying, meditation, music, aromatherapy, and being in love. There have been cases of miraculous temporary healing in painters, musicians who, when in this state, are able to move their atrophied hands or don´t feel pain when creating or executing. Painters Renoir and Gauguin and musician Andrés Segovia are examples of this.

    Mix Media Artwork by Artpicktexture

    6. Mental Health
    Painting helps us get distracted from our problems; it helps us take anguish out and transform it in something nice, which is given a title. This helps us identify the feelings and increase our expression capabilities. This is especially significant for people with nervousness, mental conditions (like schizophrenia) or people going through an emotional imbalance like a break-up who use the visual expression to achieve catharsis. Adults who learn to paint fight the fear to confront themselves, learn to persevere and are encouraged to create something that belongs only to them, a personal project, unique and enormously satisfying.

    7. Brain Activity
    Drawing and painting stimulate both the left and right brain hemispheres. The first deals with the rational, logic elements and the second one maximizes our creativity and emotions. Painting is helpful during the growth and development stages of children as well as in adulthood when it is very valuable to fight illnesses like Alzheimer. Painting boosts imagination; the imagination of Alzheimer patients, whose memory starts to vanish, is strengthened.

    Mix Media Artwork by Artpicktexture

    8. Emotional Intelligence
    Emotions are part of the creative world we all have inside. Making those emotions flow through painting helps create harmony between the heart and mind, which leads us to experiment happiness, love, empathy and peace. Within this chaotic world we live, the visualization and relaxation that we obtain through painting are tools that in the long run, benefit our emotional, organic, energetic and spiritual being.

    9. Art Appreciation
    Practice, understand and talk about art creates a better understanding of it. Individuals see themselves reflected and motivated by the work of others, which also allows us to be a receptor of this type of communication, which dates back to the beginning of human history.

    Mix Media Artwork by Artpicktexture

    10. Culture
    The knowledge that a person can achieve when learning to paint enables him/her to understand human history through art.

    11. Fun
    Learning how to paint has all the benefits of good entertainment: we laugh, socialize, learn something new, feel motivated to finish what we start, appreciate nature and feel passion for something good..

    So it's up to you, for your health, your amusement or personal goal, let's paint!

    Mix Media Artwork with Artpicktexture

    A few days ago I was asked about why painting is good for you and the reasons why an elderly person should take painting lessons into consideration as a positive activity for them. I thought this was an interesting question and an excellent topic for my blog.

    One would think that the first reason is because it gives pleasure, at least that is why I paint! Being able to do what one wants provides great satisfaction.

    After a little more meditation and research from a psychological, social and medical point of view, I have found many more benefits for the physical, mental and spiritual body not only of children but adults as well. Since I mostly teach adolescents and adults, let me summarize the information in this way:

    1. Communication
    Art makes us more human; it helps us to communicate in a different, personal language. This is a great benefit for all people and mainly for those who have conditions with a lack of communication or problems expressing themselves such as: shyness, autism and other disabilities.

    Mix Media Artwork by Artpicktexture

    2. Therapy
    Painting is an individual activity even in the workshop or classroom; the student enters his/her own world, a world full of possibilities. Stimulus of the creative mind allow the student to positively isolate from reality, which provides a mental rest that lowers stress and generates relaxation and happiness feelings. This is especially significant for people with aggression or nervousness conditions.

    3. Self-esteem
    Working in a non-competitive, relaxed environment (the teacher plays a major role here) will enable the student come closer to greater personal achievements; this will strengthen his/her individuality and self-esteem. This is especially significant for people with codependency, traumatic conditions and elderly people who need activities that can strengthen their autonomy.

    Mix Media Artwork by Artpicktexture

    4. Mobility
    Learning to hold and handle a brush and/or pencil will help regulate the hand movements and stimulate brain connections at the same time the skill is being developed. In elderly people, painting helps them strengthen their fine motor skill.

    5. Concentration and Healing
    People who immerse themselves several hours painting or creating something enter a purer area, in a very strong state of concentration; they abstract themselves from their surroundings and time passes by without noticing it. Physical pains fade away; it is almost like entering another dimension without leaving our body. This concentration state is called Alpha; one part of the brain is conscious and the other pulls the unconscious out. There is more creation because a pure energy is transmitted to what´s being created, and we can spend hours without feeling tiredness, pain or other conditions (unlike other activities.) This is a state similar to that achieved through praying, meditation, music, aromatherapy, and being in love. There have been cases of miraculous temporary healing in painters, musicians who, when in this state, are able to move their atrophied hands or don´t feel pain when creating or executing. Painters Renoir and Gauguin and musician Andrés Segovia are examples of this.

    Mix Media Artwork by Artpicktexture

    6. Mental Health
    Painting helps us get distracted from our problems; it helps us take anguish out and transform it in something nice, which is given a title. This helps us identify the feelings and increase our expression capabilities. This is especially significant for people with nervousness, mental conditions (like schizophrenia) or people going through an emotional imbalance like a break-up who use the visual expression to achieve catharsis. Adults who learn to paint fight the fear to confront themselves, learn to persevere and are encouraged to create something that belongs only to them, a personal project, unique and enormously satisfying.

    7. Brain Activity
    Drawing and painting stimulate both the left and right brain hemispheres. The first deals with the rational, logic elements and the second one maximizes our creativity and emotions. Painting is helpful during the growth and development stages of children as well as in adulthood when it is very valuable to fight illnesses like Alzheimer. Painting boosts imagination; the imagination of Alzheimer patients, whose memory starts to vanish, is strengthened.

    Mix Media Artwork by Artpicktexture

    8. Emotional Intelligence
    Emotions are part of the creative world we all have inside. Making those emotions flow through painting helps create harmony between the heart and mind, which leads us to experiment happiness, love, empathy and peace. Within this chaotic world we live, the visualization and relaxation that we obtain through painting are tools that in the long run, benefit our emotional, organic, energetic and spiritual being.

    9. Art Appreciation
    Practice, understand and talk about art creates a better understanding of it. Individuals see themselves reflected and motivated by the work of others, which also allows us to be a receptor of this type of communication, which dates back to the beginning of human history.

    Mix Media Artwork by Artpicktexture

    10. Culture
    The knowledge that a person can achieve when learning to paint enables him/her to understand human history through art.

    11. Fun
    Learning how to paint has all the benefits of good entertainment: we laugh, socialize, learn something new, feel motivated to finish what we start, appreciate nature and feel passion for something good..

    So it's up to you, for your health, your amusement or personal goal, let's paint!

    Read more

  • How Should We Read a Painting? How Should We Read a Painting?

    Posted on by Kai Wei Teng

    How to Read a Painting by Artpicktexture

    Art is a great status symbol in modern society and because of that it can be quite intimidating to the casual viewer. For many the first impulse is to blow it off, to see it as a worthless plaything for the rich and boring. This is too bad, not only because art can be a great source of pleasure in our lives, but because even a passing acquaintance with art can enrich and deepen our understanding of the world around us.

    Fortunately, developing a casual understanding of art is not all that difficult. It is true that some people devote their entire lives to studying the minutest details of an artists’ work, but there’s no need to become an expert to have a meaningful relationship with art. All it takes is a moderate attention to detail, a little bit of patience, and a willingness to reflect on your own feelings.

    Here, in this article we will show you a quick way to approach and appreciate a painting, although the ideas here can be applied to works in other mediums (sculpture, drawing, even architecture and fashion) quite easily. There’s no shortcut to understanding that we can give; great art rewards the hundredth viewing as much as he first, and you can spend a lifetime pondering the decisions an artist made in one painting. Instead, I’ll try to give you a process to follow that will help you get the most out of a painting the first time you see it.

    While we are on the subject, a word about “great art”. Andy Warhol said that if you want to tell a good painting from a bad one, first look at a thousand paintings. There are no hard and fast rules about what makes a piece great, mediocre, or bad; remember, Van Gogh’s work was once considered amateurish and forgettable. There are, of course, standards that matter within the professional art world, but you don’t owe the professionals anything, so don’t worry too much about what they think qualifies as “great”.

    Take a Look

    Art should appeal to you first through your senses. That doesn’t mean a painting has to be beautiful to be good, but it must grab your eye in some way. Give a work a moment to do its thing — some works are intriguing in subtle ways. A work might grab your attention through its subject matter, it’s use of color, an interesting juxtaposition of objects, it’s realistic appearance, a visual joke, or any number of other factors.

    Oil Painting by Artpicktexture

     

    Once you’ve gotten an overall look at the painting, ask yourself “what’s this a picture of?” That is, what is the subject of the painting? The subject might be a landscape, a person or group of people, a scene from a story, a building or city scene, an animal, a still life (a collection of everyday items like a bowl of fruit, a pile of books, or a set of tools), a fantasy scene, and so on. Some paintings won’t have a subject — much of the work of the 20th century is abstract, playing with form and color and even the quality of the paint rather than representing reality.

    The painting above, by the Dutch artist Breughel, represents the Tower of Babel. Scenes from the Bible or from classical mythology are popular in older work; since the end of the 19th century, scenes of everyday life have become more common. If you know the story, you’re one step ahead of the game, but it’s possible to enjoy the work without knowing the story it illustrates.

    What is All That About?

    Look for symbols. A symbol, very simply, is something that means something else. The Tower of Babel is a well-known symbol in Western society, representing both the dangers of pride and the disruption of human unity. Often a painting will include very clear symbols — skulls, for instance, were often included in portraits of the wealthy to remind them that their wealth was only worldly and, in the grand scheme of things, ultimately meaningless. But just as often the symbolism is unique, the artist’s own individual statement. Don’t get caught in the trap of trying to figure out “what the artist meant”; focus instead on what the work says to you.

    So How Did They Do All That?

    Artwork by Artpicktexture

    The next consideration is style, which is essentially the mark of the artist’s individual creativity on the canvas. Some artists follow well-established styles — many Renaissance portraits look almost exactly alike to the casual viewer, for instance — while others go out of their way to be different and challenging. Some artists create closely detailed, finely controlled works, others slap paint around almost haphazardly creating a wild, ecstatic effect.

    It may not seem as obvious as the subject and symbolism, but style can also convey meaning to a viewer. For example, Jackson Pollock’s famous drip paintings convey the motion and freedom of the artist in the act of creation, despite being completely abstract. Vermeer’s Milkmaid, on the other hand, is notable for it’s incredibly fine detail and careful application of thin glazes of oil paints (which doesn’t come across in a photograph, alas) which create a luminous quality, imparting a kind of nobility and even divinity to the simple act of a servant pouring milk.

    Maybe My Kids Can Paint Like That Too?

    A large part of the appeal of art is emotional — some artists go out of their way to inspire strong reactions ranging from awe and lust to anger and disgust. It’s easy to dismiss work that upsets our notion of what art could be, and any visitor to a gallery of modern art is likely to overhear at least one person complaining that “any three-year old with a box of crayons could do that!”

    Knowing that an artist may be deliberately evoking an emotional response, it pays to take a moment and question our immediate reactions. If a work makes you angry, ask yourself why. What is it about the work that upsets you? What purpose might the artist have in upsetting you? Likewise, if your feelings are positive, why are they positive? What about the painting makes you happy? And so on — take the time to examine your own emotions in the presence of the painting.

    This is by no means a complete introduction to art, let alone a complete course, but it should help get you started in appreciating art. The more you know, the better the experience will become, but you don’t need to know much to get at least something out of a painting. Keep in mind these 4 concepts (I’m trying not to call them the “Four Esses”) — subject, symbolism, style, and self-examination — and pay a visit to your local art museum or gallery and see if you don’t find something worth your time.

    Mix Media Artwork by Artpicktexture

    How to Read a Painting by Artpicktexture

    Art is a great status symbol in modern society and because of that it can be quite intimidating to the casual viewer. For many the first impulse is to blow it off, to see it as a worthless plaything for the rich and boring. This is too bad, not only because art can be a great source of pleasure in our lives, but because even a passing acquaintance with art can enrich and deepen our understanding of the world around us.

    Fortunately, developing a casual understanding of art is not all that difficult. It is true that some people devote their entire lives to studying the minutest details of an artists’ work, but there’s no need to become an expert to have a meaningful relationship with art. All it takes is a moderate attention to detail, a little bit of patience, and a willingness to reflect on your own feelings.

    Here, in this article we will show you a quick way to approach and appreciate a painting, although the ideas here can be applied to works in other mediums (sculpture, drawing, even architecture and fashion) quite easily. There’s no shortcut to understanding that we can give; great art rewards the hundredth viewing as much as he first, and you can spend a lifetime pondering the decisions an artist made in one painting. Instead, I’ll try to give you a process to follow that will help you get the most out of a painting the first time you see it.

    While we are on the subject, a word about “great art”. Andy Warhol said that if you want to tell a good painting from a bad one, first look at a thousand paintings. There are no hard and fast rules about what makes a piece great, mediocre, or bad; remember, Van Gogh’s work was once considered amateurish and forgettable. There are, of course, standards that matter within the professional art world, but you don’t owe the professionals anything, so don’t worry too much about what they think qualifies as “great”.

    Take a Look

    Art should appeal to you first through your senses. That doesn’t mean a painting has to be beautiful to be good, but it must grab your eye in some way. Give a work a moment to do its thing — some works are intriguing in subtle ways. A work might grab your attention through its subject matter, it’s use of color, an interesting juxtaposition of objects, it’s realistic appearance, a visual joke, or any number of other factors.

    Oil Painting by Artpicktexture

     

    Once you’ve gotten an overall look at the painting, ask yourself “what’s this a picture of?” That is, what is the subject of the painting? The subject might be a landscape, a person or group of people, a scene from a story, a building or city scene, an animal, a still life (a collection of everyday items like a bowl of fruit, a pile of books, or a set of tools), a fantasy scene, and so on. Some paintings won’t have a subject — much of the work of the 20th century is abstract, playing with form and color and even the quality of the paint rather than representing reality.

    The painting above, by the Dutch artist Breughel, represents the Tower of Babel. Scenes from the Bible or from classical mythology are popular in older work; since the end of the 19th century, scenes of everyday life have become more common. If you know the story, you’re one step ahead of the game, but it’s possible to enjoy the work without knowing the story it illustrates.

    What is All That About?

    Look for symbols. A symbol, very simply, is something that means something else. The Tower of Babel is a well-known symbol in Western society, representing both the dangers of pride and the disruption of human unity. Often a painting will include very clear symbols — skulls, for instance, were often included in portraits of the wealthy to remind them that their wealth was only worldly and, in the grand scheme of things, ultimately meaningless. But just as often the symbolism is unique, the artist’s own individual statement. Don’t get caught in the trap of trying to figure out “what the artist meant”; focus instead on what the work says to you.

    So How Did They Do All That?

    Artwork by Artpicktexture

    The next consideration is style, which is essentially the mark of the artist’s individual creativity on the canvas. Some artists follow well-established styles — many Renaissance portraits look almost exactly alike to the casual viewer, for instance — while others go out of their way to be different and challenging. Some artists create closely detailed, finely controlled works, others slap paint around almost haphazardly creating a wild, ecstatic effect.

    It may not seem as obvious as the subject and symbolism, but style can also convey meaning to a viewer. For example, Jackson Pollock’s famous drip paintings convey the motion and freedom of the artist in the act of creation, despite being completely abstract. Vermeer’s Milkmaid, on the other hand, is notable for it’s incredibly fine detail and careful application of thin glazes of oil paints (which doesn’t come across in a photograph, alas) which create a luminous quality, imparting a kind of nobility and even divinity to the simple act of a servant pouring milk.

    Maybe My Kids Can Paint Like That Too?

    A large part of the appeal of art is emotional — some artists go out of their way to inspire strong reactions ranging from awe and lust to anger and disgust. It’s easy to dismiss work that upsets our notion of what art could be, and any visitor to a gallery of modern art is likely to overhear at least one person complaining that “any three-year old with a box of crayons could do that!”

    Knowing that an artist may be deliberately evoking an emotional response, it pays to take a moment and question our immediate reactions. If a work makes you angry, ask yourself why. What is it about the work that upsets you? What purpose might the artist have in upsetting you? Likewise, if your feelings are positive, why are they positive? What about the painting makes you happy? And so on — take the time to examine your own emotions in the presence of the painting.

    This is by no means a complete introduction to art, let alone a complete course, but it should help get you started in appreciating art. The more you know, the better the experience will become, but you don’t need to know much to get at least something out of a painting. Keep in mind these 4 concepts (I’m trying not to call them the “Four Esses”) — subject, symbolism, style, and self-examination — and pay a visit to your local art museum or gallery and see if you don’t find something worth your time.

    Mix Media Artwork by Artpicktexture

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  • What are the Different Types of Art Paintings Styles What are the Different Types of Art Paintings Styles

    Posted on by Kai Wei Teng

    In a casual setting where conversation about an artwork is involved, more often than not we only can point out if it is more eastern or western, but as the art of painting has been evolving ever more incessantly. The way an artist visualizes a scenario and then depicting it on an empty canvas is changing. The use and selection of colors are more complex and the way thoughts are illustrated on the canvas is becoming more intricate.

    In this blog post, we find out the different practices and styles that artists follow in creating their paintings.

    The Eastern Style

    The Chinese Painting Style

    Chinese Painting Style by Artpicktexture

    The oldest artistic tradition in the world, Chinese painting, involves techniques used in Calligraphy. The artists use colored inks for painting on paper, silk etc. But, they never use oil for painting.

    Gong-bi and Shui-mo, meaning meticulous and ink & wash painting, are the two widely used techniques. The first technique uses detailed and precise brush strokes while the other is the common watercolor painting.

    The artists are not just drawing the appearance of an object. They look to capture the soul of that object, the energy within, the spirit. This is what makes Chinese paintings different. They also try to keep the use of extravagant and vibrant colors to the minimum.

    The Chinese artists follow six principles of painting, which was actually set up in the 5th century. The six principles are:

    1. Spirit Resonance“, or vitality. It refers to the flow of energy that encompasses theme, work, and artist. Xie He, an ancient Chinese artist, said that without Spirit Resonance, there was no need to look further.
    2. Bone Method“, or the way of using the brush. This refers not only to texture and brush stroke, but also to the close link between handwriting and personality. In his day, the art of calligraphy was inseparable from painting.
    3. Correspondence to the Object“, or the depicting of form, which would include shape and line.
    4. Suitability to Type“, or the application of color, including layers, value and tone.
    5. Division and Planning“, or placing and arrangement. It corresponds to composition, space and depth.
    6. Transmission by Copying“, or the copying of models, not only from life but also the works of antiquity.

    Today, Chinese artists have started experimenting with new themes and colors by breaking out of the tradition. These Chinese artists are influenced by western techniques. They are ready to try their luck from outside the box of tradition.

    Japanese Painting Style

    Japanese Painting Style By Artpicktexture

    Japanese art can mesmerize you in many ways. If you look at it from the outside, its charm, simplicity and fluency can greatly make you want it. But if you try to learn more about Japanese painting, you will find yourself in a world of bewilderment. If you are not familiar with Japanese terms, you will find this art not so easy. Japanese painting takes influences from Chinese, other eastern and western art.

    Japanese painting art has its own schools of thought and styles. ‘Suibokuga‘ is one such school of art, where artists use only black ink for painting. The kind of paintings Japanese artists produced using only black ink would amaze any world-class artist. This school of art was result of a direct influence from Chinese art and Buddhism.

    Kano’ was another school of art that budded in the 15th century. This school was a total conflict with the existing ‘Suibokuga’ school. In fact, it was a sign of protest against not using vibrant colors in painting. So, Kano followers used bright and vibrant colors in their paintings. This school of arts has many branches today including the prominent ‘Ukiyo-e’.

    The Shijo’ school of art was a derivative from the old ‘Kano’ school. Use of common people as subject and portraying their emotions was characteristic of this school of art. ‘Shijo’ school of art produced more realistic and sometimes cynical paintings.

    In 19th century Japan, a new form of art painting came up called ‘Nanga’. You can identify this school of art by the use of natural scenes and subjects like landscapes, flowers and even cultural influences.

    Indian Painting Style

    Indian Painting Style by Artpicktexture

    Being extremely diverse in culture, you can expect Indian painting tradition to be diverse as well. Indian painting is mostly a direct result of traditions and changing life styles over the years. You would even find Indian rock paintings dating back to as early as 5500 BC. The caves of Ajanta and Ellora are famous for its mural paintings.

    During the reign of Mughal empire, Indian painting tradition took a new turn. A new form of painting called Mughal painting came up. ‘Hamzanama’ is one of the first and most famous Mughal paintings known today. Rulers of that time, Akbar, Jahangir, and Shah Jahan were all keen in promoting the art of painting. However, Aurangzeb showed little interest in arts and this probably led to downfall of art painting afterwards.

    Next major era of painting started during the Rajput Empire and is called Rajput Paintings. The artists preferred creation of miniatures, but the subjects of the paintings were diverse. You would find paintings illustrating events from great Indian epics, landscapes and human life. Rajput Paintings are famous for its rich use of colors. An interesting fact about the colors used for these paintings is that some of the colors used were made from precious stones, silver and even gold! It took weeks to prepare the colors needed for these paintings. 

    Mysore paintings are famous for the level of detailing given to the subjects and for the use of gentle colors. Like any other classical South Indian painting, Gods and scenes from Hindu mythologies found its place reserved in Mysore paintings.

    The creation of a perfect Mysore Painting has many stages. It starts with a rough sketch of the image. The base on which this sketch is made is just a paper pasted on a wooden board. First the throne or anything of that importance are painted.  Even gold foils were used for a better output. Then, watercolor is used to complete the painting, but only gentle tones.

    Tanjore painting is perhaps the most important and old classical painting of south India. Use of rich colors, attention given to every minute detail and, most importantly, elegance, are some specialties of Tanjore paintings. The artists used precious stones and threads to make paintings look better. Dyes were used for giving color to the paintings.

    When it comes to modern times, there is only one prevailing style in Indian art painting. That has to be the Bengal School style of painting.

    Artists like Abanindranath Tagore promoted this painting style in spite of many controversies following this new thought. However, artists were always looking to break free of these traditions. The modern Indian painting is a result of struggle by Indian painters to break the shackles.

    The Western Style

    Modernism

    Modernism Painting Style by Artpicktexture

    Even though many have tried to define modernism, the real modernism has always managed to slip away from those definitions. Somebody had to draw a line and it turned out to be the art critics who took up the responsibility. So, now, Modernism is officially the period between 1860 and 1970.

    In simple words, modernism is a break away from the traditional form of art painting. One can say it is an infused form of art derived from many disciplines. In a way, modernism is a radical way of thinking by artists of that era, with no boundaries set by traditional method.

    Impressionism

    Impressionism Painting Style by Artpicktexture

    Impressionism is an art movement originated in Paris in late 19th century. Impressionism caught eyes of many critics, but mostly for the wrong reasons. The thin brush strokes, common and ordinary subjects, unusual angles etc. are some features of this style of art painting. Outdoor sceneries of landscapes and even streets became settings for impressionist painters.

    If you look closely at impressionist paintings, you will find that black is a color that is rarely used. For dark tones, complementary colors were mixed and used. The artists were very keen about making the color and reflection right for every object on the canvas. More importance was given to natural lighting. Impressionist paintings were even considered as an alternative to photography, which then lacked the luxury of colors.

    Abstract Style

    Abstract Painting Style by Artpicktexture

    Any art that illustrates anything, but not in the truest of forms, can be classified as abstract art. This is a real product of radical thought.

    In abstract paintings, you will never find a man, animal or even any real life object. Every object on the canvas is represented as either colors and or shapes. A simple shape on the painting can do many wonders. The artist might augment the shape with some simple exaggerations. Sometimes, the shape is scaled down to produce the effect the artist wants on the canvas.

    The colors on the canvas represent emotions and shapes symbolize objects. In the abstract style paintings of 21st century, anything can happen on the canvas. There is hardly any direction on the abstract paintings of today. Yet, the results are appealing and aesthetically satisfying.

    Expressionism

    Expressionism Painting Style by Artpicktexture

    The abstract style of art takes many forms. Expressionism is one such form. This style of painting is closely related to the emotions and feelings of human heart. This emotional overflow of human heart is illustrated from a subject’s perspective. The expressionist paintings either represents emotional state of the artist or is intended to induce some kind of an emotional echo within the viewer.

    Jackson Pollock was one of the biggest names in expressionist art painting. However, in most of his famous creations, he hardly touched the canvas with a brush. Pouring paint onto the canvas was his style of painting. This way he could capture the natural movement of paint too. Another famous expressionist artist is Vincent Van Gogh.

    Cubism

    Cubism Painting Style by Artpicktexture

    Famous artist Paul Cezanne said that, “Everything in nature takes its form from the sphere, the cone, and the cylinder.” Later this became the basis of Cubism. In this abstract art form, geometrical solids play an important role. The final product will be a blend of actual form of the object and some geometrical shape.

    Today, Cubism is another style of abstract art painting. But, Cubism was a strong presence in the art world even before abstract painting became prevalent. People like Picasso, Braque, Gris etc followed Cubism and made it famous. The world of art painting would have never been the same without contributions from these Cubist artists.

    Surrealism

    Surrealism Painting Style by Artpicktexture

    Although not the purest form of abstract painting, you will find traces of abstract thinking in Surrealism. This is actually a movement that sprouted in the early 20th century. It included writing and many forms of visual artworks. Obviously, paintings became a big part of this movement. These Surrealistic paintings could strike you with elements of surprise. This remains one of its primary features too. Juxtaposition, placing two abstract concepts together, is another feature of Surrealistic paintings.

    In a casual setting where conversation about an artwork is involved, more often than not we only can point out if it is more eastern or western, but as the art of painting has been evolving ever more incessantly. The way an artist visualizes a scenario and then depicting it on an empty canvas is changing. The use and selection of colors are more complex and the way thoughts are illustrated on the canvas is becoming more intricate.

    In this blog post, we find out the different practices and styles that artists follow in creating their paintings.

    The Eastern Style

    The Chinese Painting Style

    Chinese Painting Style by Artpicktexture

    The oldest artistic tradition in the world, Chinese painting, involves techniques used in Calligraphy. The artists use colored inks for painting on paper, silk etc. But, they never use oil for painting.

    Gong-bi and Shui-mo, meaning meticulous and ink & wash painting, are the two widely used techniques. The first technique uses detailed and precise brush strokes while the other is the common watercolor painting.

    The artists are not just drawing the appearance of an object. They look to capture the soul of that object, the energy within, the spirit. This is what makes Chinese paintings different. They also try to keep the use of extravagant and vibrant colors to the minimum.

    The Chinese artists follow six principles of painting, which was actually set up in the 5th century. The six principles are:

    1. Spirit Resonance“, or vitality. It refers to the flow of energy that encompasses theme, work, and artist. Xie He, an ancient Chinese artist, said that without Spirit Resonance, there was no need to look further.
    2. Bone Method“, or the way of using the brush. This refers not only to texture and brush stroke, but also to the close link between handwriting and personality. In his day, the art of calligraphy was inseparable from painting.
    3. Correspondence to the Object“, or the depicting of form, which would include shape and line.
    4. Suitability to Type“, or the application of color, including layers, value and tone.
    5. Division and Planning“, or placing and arrangement. It corresponds to composition, space and depth.
    6. Transmission by Copying“, or the copying of models, not only from life but also the works of antiquity.

    Today, Chinese artists have started experimenting with new themes and colors by breaking out of the tradition. These Chinese artists are influenced by western techniques. They are ready to try their luck from outside the box of tradition.

    Japanese Painting Style

    Japanese Painting Style By Artpicktexture

    Japanese art can mesmerize you in many ways. If you look at it from the outside, its charm, simplicity and fluency can greatly make you want it. But if you try to learn more about Japanese painting, you will find yourself in a world of bewilderment. If you are not familiar with Japanese terms, you will find this art not so easy. Japanese painting takes influences from Chinese, other eastern and western art.

    Japanese painting art has its own schools of thought and styles. ‘Suibokuga‘ is one such school of art, where artists use only black ink for painting. The kind of paintings Japanese artists produced using only black ink would amaze any world-class artist. This school of art was result of a direct influence from Chinese art and Buddhism.

    Kano’ was another school of art that budded in the 15th century. This school was a total conflict with the existing ‘Suibokuga’ school. In fact, it was a sign of protest against not using vibrant colors in painting. So, Kano followers used bright and vibrant colors in their paintings. This school of arts has many branches today including the prominent ‘Ukiyo-e’.

    The Shijo’ school of art was a derivative from the old ‘Kano’ school. Use of common people as subject and portraying their emotions was characteristic of this school of art. ‘Shijo’ school of art produced more realistic and sometimes cynical paintings.

    In 19th century Japan, a new form of art painting came up called ‘Nanga’. You can identify this school of art by the use of natural scenes and subjects like landscapes, flowers and even cultural influences.

    Indian Painting Style

    Indian Painting Style by Artpicktexture

    Being extremely diverse in culture, you can expect Indian painting tradition to be diverse as well. Indian painting is mostly a direct result of traditions and changing life styles over the years. You would even find Indian rock paintings dating back to as early as 5500 BC. The caves of Ajanta and Ellora are famous for its mural paintings.

    During the reign of Mughal empire, Indian painting tradition took a new turn. A new form of painting called Mughal painting came up. ‘Hamzanama’ is one of the first and most famous Mughal paintings known today. Rulers of that time, Akbar, Jahangir, and Shah Jahan were all keen in promoting the art of painting. However, Aurangzeb showed little interest in arts and this probably led to downfall of art painting afterwards.

    Next major era of painting started during the Rajput Empire and is called Rajput Paintings. The artists preferred creation of miniatures, but the subjects of the paintings were diverse. You would find paintings illustrating events from great Indian epics, landscapes and human life. Rajput Paintings are famous for its rich use of colors. An interesting fact about the colors used for these paintings is that some of the colors used were made from precious stones, silver and even gold! It took weeks to prepare the colors needed for these paintings. 

    Mysore paintings are famous for the level of detailing given to the subjects and for the use of gentle colors. Like any other classical South Indian painting, Gods and scenes from Hindu mythologies found its place reserved in Mysore paintings.

    The creation of a perfect Mysore Painting has many stages. It starts with a rough sketch of the image. The base on which this sketch is made is just a paper pasted on a wooden board. First the throne or anything of that importance are painted.  Even gold foils were used for a better output. Then, watercolor is used to complete the painting, but only gentle tones.

    Tanjore painting is perhaps the most important and old classical painting of south India. Use of rich colors, attention given to every minute detail and, most importantly, elegance, are some specialties of Tanjore paintings. The artists used precious stones and threads to make paintings look better. Dyes were used for giving color to the paintings.

    When it comes to modern times, there is only one prevailing style in Indian art painting. That has to be the Bengal School style of painting.

    Artists like Abanindranath Tagore promoted this painting style in spite of many controversies following this new thought. However, artists were always looking to break free of these traditions. The modern Indian painting is a result of struggle by Indian painters to break the shackles.

    The Western Style

    Modernism

    Modernism Painting Style by Artpicktexture

    Even though many have tried to define modernism, the real modernism has always managed to slip away from those definitions. Somebody had to draw a line and it turned out to be the art critics who took up the responsibility. So, now, Modernism is officially the period between 1860 and 1970.

    In simple words, modernism is a break away from the traditional form of art painting. One can say it is an infused form of art derived from many disciplines. In a way, modernism is a radical way of thinking by artists of that era, with no boundaries set by traditional method.

    Impressionism

    Impressionism Painting Style by Artpicktexture

    Impressionism is an art movement originated in Paris in late 19th century. Impressionism caught eyes of many critics, but mostly for the wrong reasons. The thin brush strokes, common and ordinary subjects, unusual angles etc. are some features of this style of art painting. Outdoor sceneries of landscapes and even streets became settings for impressionist painters.

    If you look closely at impressionist paintings, you will find that black is a color that is rarely used. For dark tones, complementary colors were mixed and used. The artists were very keen about making the color and reflection right for every object on the canvas. More importance was given to natural lighting. Impressionist paintings were even considered as an alternative to photography, which then lacked the luxury of colors.

    Abstract Style

    Abstract Painting Style by Artpicktexture

    Any art that illustrates anything, but not in the truest of forms, can be classified as abstract art. This is a real product of radical thought.

    In abstract paintings, you will never find a man, animal or even any real life object. Every object on the canvas is represented as either colors and or shapes. A simple shape on the painting can do many wonders. The artist might augment the shape with some simple exaggerations. Sometimes, the shape is scaled down to produce the effect the artist wants on the canvas.

    The colors on the canvas represent emotions and shapes symbolize objects. In the abstract style paintings of 21st century, anything can happen on the canvas. There is hardly any direction on the abstract paintings of today. Yet, the results are appealing and aesthetically satisfying.

    Expressionism

    Expressionism Painting Style by Artpicktexture

    The abstract style of art takes many forms. Expressionism is one such form. This style of painting is closely related to the emotions and feelings of human heart. This emotional overflow of human heart is illustrated from a subject’s perspective. The expressionist paintings either represents emotional state of the artist or is intended to induce some kind of an emotional echo within the viewer.

    Jackson Pollock was one of the biggest names in expressionist art painting. However, in most of his famous creations, he hardly touched the canvas with a brush. Pouring paint onto the canvas was his style of painting. This way he could capture the natural movement of paint too. Another famous expressionist artist is Vincent Van Gogh.

    Cubism

    Cubism Painting Style by Artpicktexture

    Famous artist Paul Cezanne said that, “Everything in nature takes its form from the sphere, the cone, and the cylinder.” Later this became the basis of Cubism. In this abstract art form, geometrical solids play an important role. The final product will be a blend of actual form of the object and some geometrical shape.

    Today, Cubism is another style of abstract art painting. But, Cubism was a strong presence in the art world even before abstract painting became prevalent. People like Picasso, Braque, Gris etc followed Cubism and made it famous. The world of art painting would have never been the same without contributions from these Cubist artists.

    Surrealism

    Surrealism Painting Style by Artpicktexture

    Although not the purest form of abstract painting, you will find traces of abstract thinking in Surrealism. This is actually a movement that sprouted in the early 20th century. It included writing and many forms of visual artworks. Obviously, paintings became a big part of this movement. These Surrealistic paintings could strike you with elements of surprise. This remains one of its primary features too. Juxtaposition, placing two abstract concepts together, is another feature of Surrealistic paintings.

    Read more